Things You Should Know

Am I ready for a dog?
What kind of dog should I get?
How much exercise do they need?
What should I feed them?
Do they need training?
When do I need to take them to the vet?

Am I ready for a dog?

Your dog is a commitment.  A serious one.  Both financially, and in the time and effort they require.  You are taking on the responsibility for another living being.  They rely on you for food, shelter, water and, most importantly, love and attention.  It’s not a commitment you should take lightly.  Make sure you are in the right personal and financial space to make that commitment. Talk it through, do your research, make sure your new dog is right for you and your living situation.  Ask the rescue group for advice. 

It can be serious stuff, but there is gold at the end of the rainbow.  In turn, your dog will love you unconditionally, be a wonderful addition to your family, bring you improved physical health, help your stress levels and improve your social life.  All scientifically proven facts!  Enjoy the search for your new pup and we look forward to welcoming you to the SavourLife family!

What kind of dog should I get?

What kind of dog is a very personal choice and depends a lot on your lifestyle.  You need to take things like your living situation (house or apartment), family situation (kids, other animals), financial situation (feeding and vets), amount of time at home (your travel, long working hours), your leisure activities (will your pup be included) into consideration before you adopt or get a new dog.  Talk to the rescue group about your lifestyle, they will do their best to match your lifestyle to your new best friend.

How much exercise do they need?

Making the time each day to exercise your dog (which will benefit yourself as well) is important for your pooch. Each breed is different in the time-frame they need each day. Small dogs can be full of energy, where larger dogs would need a 30-40-minute walk plus additional exercise options too!  Just like us, as dogs get older they will slow down and may not need the same amount of exercise

Small dogs such as Terriers, working dogs like Kelpies, and snow dogs like Huskies, have enormous amounts of energy and can run for extended periods. The more exercise they have helps burn off excess energy, if they don’t it could cause behavioural problems, such as chewing, digging, or excess barking.  Make sure you consider the amount of time you can spend exercising your dog carefully.

What should I feed them?

If your dog is eating the proper nutrition, potentially less time and money will be spent taking your dog to the vet for illnesses or allergies, and picking up number twos in the backyard!  Their overall health can be in a large part determined by their diet.

Make sure your food is natural, has a high protein and meat content, and has vegetables, fruits, vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Make sure its balanced and follows standards like AAFCO.  Feed an age appropriate food, for example a puppy specific food if you have a puppy.

Be careful with human foods and don't feed your dog food that is bad for it. There are many human foods that are not only bad for your dog but that can be hazardous to their health. Do not give your dog any chocolate, avocado, bread dough, raisins, grapes, onions and some artificial sweeteners.

Buying a premium quality food may seem more expensive at the time, but long term it will save you time, money and especially benefit your dog’s health and happiness!  You can check out our range of all-natural Australian-made food and treats here

Do they need training?

Any dog, at any age, can be trained.  Training daily is imperative, especially for a puppy or dog under 2 years of age. You can do this by personally having someone coming to your house and assisting with training, joining groups such as puppy school or agility classes depending on the age.

You will always be training your dog daily whether its tricks or just working on the current lessons, to help improve their stimulation and ensure they don’t get bored and to reinforce good behaviour.

When do I need to take them to the vet?

Make sure you have a good, reliable veterinarian. It can be a bit daunting to figure out which one is right for you.  Your vet is like your family GP for your pup, so find one you are comfortable with and one close to home.

Always make sure you are aware of where the closest 24-hour vet is for late at night and weekends. Keep it recorded somewhere where everyone can easily locate it, so if you need to act immediately you can.

Pet health insurance has become quite important in a modern family, it ensures you are covered in case your dog falls very ill or injured, just like human health insurance.   Some treatments can run into thousands of dollars. We strongly recommend you get insurance.  It can alleviate some horrible choices in some very stressful situations.  Take a look at one like Petbarn Pet Insurance.  They will cover up to 80% of your expenses for the treatment. This will ensure the safety and health of your dog and yourself.  

See your vet for a check-up regularly. They will talk you through and check up with you each time on vaccinations, worming & flea treatments. Your local pet speciality store will also have knowledge on pharmaceutical care and the best products to buy that are affordable and manageable, to ensure your pet is safe from parasites and ticks.  Click on the links below to find a vet close to you!

Greencross VETS 

Best Friends Vets

PETstock Vets